Saturday, June 27, 2009

Norsk Rikskringkasting (NRK) / Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) - 23 Stories

From the NRK website: "NRK's corporate social responsibility is summed up in our business concept by four catchwords: We will inform, develop, challenge and entertain Norway with our programming." NRK may entertain, challenge, but is seems like they need to better develop their knowledge of Canada, Canadians, and Canadian culture. Of the 10 posted stories listed below (and there must be others) NRK does a good job of misinforming readers about Canada, Canadians, and Canadian culture. Do these journalists just have a blank cheque to assume or guess what they are writing is correct about Canada and Canadians? Do these journalists not verify information before they print a story? And why have no corrections been made to some of these mistakes, even after the journalist and NRK have been informed? Shania Twain an American?? Canadian football is American football?? The 2010 Winter Olympics in the USA?? The Canadian province of British Columbia is in the USA?? The Canadian city of Calgary (also the 1988 host city for the winter Olympics) is in the USA?? Canadian wrestler Chris Benoit is an American? Canada's Prime Minister is a President?? Why are there so many mistakes about even the most basic of information about Canada??
1) Shania Twain (Elisabeth and Roger Myren) 23 January 2006
In this story the Norwegian journalists have listed Canadian singer Shania Twain as an "American." Wrong nationality. Shania Twain is from Canada, not from the USA, and she is Canadian, not an American. Shania Twain was born and raised in the province of Ontario in Canada, and that would make her a Canadian. For some strange reason these journalists have written she is an American. Was it a guess or an assumption? Do Norwegians think all the success music and culture that comes from North America is from the USA? Mexico and Canada are in North America, and yet Canada and Mexico do produce successful cultural exports. It's very strange to write she is an American since NRK lists her Canadian birthplace. Why would these journalists inform their Norwegian readership she is an American when she is a Canadian? If a Norwegian musician is born and raised in Norway, does that make him or her Swedish or German? After e-mailing these journalists they corrected their mistake.
2) Hardangermoreller til hele verden (By Jo Hjelle og Asle Hella) 27 July 2006
http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/distrikt/hordaland/1.778556
In this story the Norwegian journalists write: "De norske morellene overtar i uke 33 morell-hegemoniet fra British Columbia i USA, og det betyr at norske moreller blir enerådende i England." British Columbia is a not located in the USA. British Columbia is a Canadian province located on the west coast of the country of Canada. That is like writing that Stavanger in Norway is located in Sweden, Denmark or Germany. Most likely this was a guess or an assumption, as it seems many Norwegian journalists assume or guess they know about Canada and don't bother to verify their facts before publishing many of their stories. This website is evidence of this Norwegian problem. The mistake was later fixed.
3) I kjølvatnet a Leiv Eriksson (By Gunnar Sandvik) 11 June 2007
http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/distrikt/more_og_romsdal/1.2673322
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes: "New Foundland og Canada," but the province of Newfoundland is located in Canada. As well, the spelling of the province of Newfoundland as "New Foundland" is not correct. The province's name is one word - Newfoundland. That is like spelling Norway - "Nor Way." In one line the story states: "Det er en tøff jobb å komme inn det amerikanske markedet, sier verksjef Dr. Robert J. Petzenhauser ved Hustadmarmor. Men vi er stolte over å ha greid det." Does he mean the American market or the Canadian market, or the North American market? After contacting the author the correct spelling of Newfoundland was updated in the story.
4) Norge tek maten frå kvalen (By Øyvind Andre Haram) 5 November 2007
http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/1.3952784
In this story the journalist writes: "Universitetet i British Colombia i Canada." The province of British Columbia in Canada is spelt, Columbia not "Colombia". Colombia is a country in South America. This is a fairly common mistake in the Norwegian press relating to this Canadian province.
5) Wrestlingstjerne, kone og barn funnet døde (By Anders Brekke) 26 June 2007
http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/utenriks/1.2803933
In this story about Canadian wrestler Chris Benoit the Norwegian journalist writes: "Den amerikanske wrestlingstjernen Chris Benoit ble funnet død med sin kone og sønn mandag. Saken etterforskes som dobbeldrap og selvmord." Wrong nationality. Chris Benoit is a Canadian, not an American as the journalist has written. He may have lived and worked in the USA for his career, but this Canadian comes from one of the French speaking parts of Canada, and has a French-Canadian name. He is not an American as NRK has written. To put this into context, this is like writing a Norwegian is Swedish just because he lives and works in Sweden, or a Norwegian is a German just because he lives and works in Germany. The worst part is the original AP story does not state he is an American, in fact even refers to his wrestling nickname as the "Canadian Crippler." Did the journalist just guess or assume he is American and decided to add that in?
6) G8: Fra klima til atomvåpen (Rima Iraki) 6 June 2007
http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/utenriks/1.2627427
In this story the NRK writes underneath the photograph "Fra venstre til høyre: USAs president George Bush, den kanadiske presidenten Stephen Harper...." Canadian President?? This is a mistake, Canada does not have a president, it has a Prime Minister. Mexico and the USA are the only two republics in North America, and thus the only two countries in North America with a president. Canada is not a republic, and has basically the same system of government as Great Britain and many other countries with a Monarch. Canada is a Constitutional Monarchy with Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, and a parliamentary system of government modelled off of Great Britain's government. Canada was a former French colony, conquered by Britain in 1758-1763, and given to Britain by treaty in 1763, and remained a British colony until the Canadians negotiated independence from Great Britain in 1867. This is an excellent example of how so often many Norwegian journalists guess or apply what they know of the USA thinking it must be the same in Canada. Why do so many Norwegian stories so often say Canada uses USA's currency (and not Canadian currency)? Canada has "states" (and not Canada provinces)? Canada has a "president" (and not a Canadian Prime Minister?) etc. How are such basic facts of the country of Canada so often incorrectly reported? Some Norwegian journalists must be so convinced they "know" the country of Canada to write this information without even checking their basic facts before printing a story.
7) - Ingen kan ta oss (Lene Granli og Fredrik Hansen) 26 March 2008
In this story the Norwegian journalists write: "Han satser i hvert fall mot OL i Vancouver i USA i 2010, men først går tankene mot åpningskampen mot Tyskland lørdag." This is a mistake. First, the country of Canada, not the USA is hosting the 2010 Winter Olympics. What these journalists have written is like a Canadian journalist writing "Lillehammer in Germany" is hosting the Olympics. And Second, the Canadian city of Vancouver is located in the Canadian province of British Columbia in the country of Canada, not in the USA as the journalists write. After e-mailing the journalists and NRK four times the story has still not been corrected.
8) Gull til Stordal (By Camilla Wernersen/ Elin Svilaas) 20 Dec. 2004
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes: " nyåret skal Stordal til Calgary i USA for å kjempe i World cup sprinten og målet fremover er også en medalje i OL i 2006." This is wrong. The city of Calgary is a Canadian city located in Canada, not in the USA.
9) 2008: Godt for inuitter i Canada (By Piera Balto) 30 Dec. 2008
In this story the writer states: "Den siste avtalen om landrettighetene ble inngått i Nunavik, Nord Quebeck, etter mange års forhandlinger. Både Nunavik og Nunatsiavut har fått hjemmestyre." The province of Québec in Canada is spelt Québec, not Quebeck as written.
10) Nærmer seg OL i 2014 (Andreas Budalen & Tommy Barstein) 23 october 2009
In this story the Norwegian journalists write "I sommer kom avgjørelsen om at det ikke ble hopping i vinterens OL i Vancouver etter at høyesterett i den canadiske delstaten British Columbia avslo kravet fra en gruppe kvinnelige skihopper." Delstaten?? How can there be states in Canada, when Canada does not have states? British Columbia is a province in Canada, and has been since 1871. The Norwegian word for province is provins. With just over a few months till the Olympics in Canada, it might be a good time to for NRK to learn there are no states in Canada. "I sommer kom avgjørelsen om at det ikke ble hopping i vinterens OL i Vancouver etter at høyesterett i den canadiske provinsen British Columbia avslo kravet fra en gruppe kvinnelige skihopper." An e-mail was sent to NRK, but no reply was received from the journalist.
11) Klart for historisk åpningsseremoni (Kristian Elster & Ole Jacob Jorsett) 12 February, 2009http://www.nrksport.no/1.6476099
In this story about Vancouver, Canada and the upcoming winter Olympics in Canada, the Norwegian journalists have written under the photo of the interior of British Columbia Place " innsiden av BC Place Stadium under en amerikansk fotballkamp." American football team?? Wrong sport and wrong country and wrong nationality. The Canadian team is not an American football team, it is a Canadian football team. These are three different types of the game of football played in North America. The team is the provincial team for British Columbia called the British Columbia Lions (B.C. Lions), and they play Canadian football, a different type of football than American football, with different number of players, different field size, rules, history, etc. The team pictured there is the B.C. Lions, and they are part of the Canadian Football League / Ligue canadienne de football. These journalists have incorrectly identified the game of Canadian football as American football. These are two separate and different games. American football is played in the USA, not in Canada, and Canadian football is played in Canada, not in the USA. It is two different sports. What they have written is like a Canadian journalist writing Norwegians play Australian football.
12) Ein redda etter helikopterstyrt (By Magnus Stokka) 12 March 2009
http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/utenriks/1.6522200
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes about the Canadian province of Newfoundland & Labrador on the east coast of Canada. In the story he writes: "New Foundland." This is not correct. The spelling is Newfoundland. That would be like a Canadian journalist spelling Norway - Nor Way. Not a major mistake, but considering Newfoundland was first discovered in 1497, and ca. 1000 by the Icelandic Norse, and is the closest piece of North America to Europe, it's not some spec of an island in the middle of the Atlantic.
13) Nortel venter underskudd 180 milliarder (Author not stated) 18 June 2001
http://www3.nrk.no/magasin/nyheter/okonomi/1093605.html
In this story the journalist writes: "Amerikanske Nortel Networks varslet før helgen at selskapet vil rapportere et underskudd rundt 180 milliarder norske kroner i årets andre kvartal. Dette betyr at 10.000 mister arbeidet." American?? This is not correct. How can it be American when the company is Canadian, and from Canada? Canada's Nortel Network is Canadian, not American. It should say: "Kanadiske Nortel Networks varslet før helgen at selskapet vil rapportere et underskudd rundt 180 milliarder norske kroner i årets andre kvartal."
14) - Obamas nettmøte er historisk
(By Oddvin Aune) 26 March 2009
http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/kultur/1.6543552
In this story the Norwegian journalists writes: "Barack Obama ble under valgkampen avbildet et utall ganger med sin Blackberry – en amerikansk smart-telefon, spesiallaget for e-post-bruk." American phone?? Wrong nationality. How can it be American when Blackberry is a Canadian telephone? BlackBerry is not American as the writer states. Blackberry comes from Canada, not the USA. This should say: "Barack Obama ble under valgkampen avbildet et utall ganger med sin Blackberry – en kanadisk smart-telefon, spesiallaget for e-post-bruk." Research in Motion, the makers of Blackberry and this Canadian technology and phone come from the province of Ontario in Canada, not the USA. Yes, Obama, the Americans (and nor available in Norway) love this phone yes, but the product is Canadian.
15) 45.000 km til OL (By Arve Lote) 22 October 2009
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes: "hovedstaden i delstaten British Columbia landest vestkyst - ikke langt fra Vancouver, der vinter-OL skal avvikles fra 12. til 28. februar 2010." Delstaten?? How can there be states in Canada, when Canada does not have states? British Columbia is a province in Canada, and has been since 1871. The Norwegian word for province is provins. To be correct it should say: "hovedstaden i provinen British Columbia landest vestkyst - ikke langt fra Vancouver, der vinter-OL skal avvikles fra 12. til 28. februar 2010." Canada has been using provinces for 346 years, since 1663, when Canada became a Royal Province of France. The only two countries in North America with states are Mexico and the USA.
16) Med balsaflåte over Stillehavet 19 April, 2002
17) Gullfeber i Klondike (By 7 August, 2007) Ingelin Røssland
18) Noen styrkerekorder (Viggo Valle) 7 August, 2007
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes: "Rekorden for å heve seg selv opp én arm har Robert Chisholm fra Canada. Han klarte 22 ganger rad da han deltok i en turnering Queen's University i Kongston i delstaten Ontario 3. desember 1982." Delstaten?? Kongston? There is not states in Canada. Ontario is a province in Canada, and has been since 1867. Canada has been using provinces for 346 years when Canada became a royal province of France. Mexico and the USA are the only two countries in North America with states, Canada does not. And the Canadian city of Kingston is spelt "Kingston," not "Kongston" as the journalist writes. To be correct the story should say: "Rekorden for å heve seg selv opp én arm har Robert Chisholm fra Canada. Han klarte 22 ganger rad da han deltok i en turnering Queen's University i Kingston i provinsen Ontario 3. desember 1982."
19) Indianerjenta i Canada - 26 October 2002
20) Reddet etter natt isflak (Anne Cecilie) 9 November, 2009
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes: "Det viste seg at de to hadde kommet bort fra hverandre like ved utløpet av Hudson Bay i Nunavuat-provinsen i Canada." Province? Nunavut is a territory in Canada, not a province. Canadian territories does not have provincial status in Canada. They are basically one step lower politically than a Canadian province. Canada is divided by three territories and 10 provinces. Also, the location Coral Harbour is spelt "Coral Harbour" with the Canadian spelling, not Harbor. After e-mailing NRK and the journalists, the story has never been corrected. It's amazing that even the most basic information about a Canadian story is not correct, nor any desire to correct the story.
21) 11 av 13 nobelprisvinnere i ett rom (Oddvin Aune) 2 December, 2009
In this story about Nobel winners in physics, NRK writes: "Og i år ble det ekstra folksomt. Hele 11 av årets 13 nobelprisvinnere er amerikanere, hvorav 10 er fra USA og én fra Canada." Eleven are Americans?? That is not correct, Willard Boyle's nationality is Canadian, not American. He comes from the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. Yes, he was working in the USA at an American university at the time, but that does not make his nationality American. For example, the Norwegian golfer Susann Petterson who won the Canadian Open Women's Golf in 2009, lives and trains in the USA, but she's still a Norwegian, and the Canadian media didn't report her as an "American" that won the Canadian Open. If a Norwegian works at a Canadian university and wins the Nobel prize for physics, he's still a Norwegian. Further on in the story the photo captions states: "Amerikanerne Willard Boyle, Charles Kao og George E. Smith fikk Nobelprisen i fysikk 2009." Again, Boyle's nationality is Canadian, he's from Canada, not the USA. This story is an excellent example of the Norwegian double standard towards Canadians. It's amazing how easily some Norwegian journalists can take away a Canadian's nationality and identity, and just identify him or her as an American, or from the USA or some other country, but Norwegians that live and work in the USA or some other country for their careers are still considered Norwegians. Norwegian stories relating to Knute Rockne, Torill Kove, or Swedish born Canadian actor Malin Ackerman still credit these Swedes and Norwegians as Swedish and Norwegian, but so often Canadians get their nationality and citizenship changed to American, and not Canadian. After several e-mails over the course of a week, the story was finally corrected, and Canadian Willard Boyle given proper credit. How can Norwegian readers trust some of the content written about Canada, Canadians, and Canadian culture, if the most basic of Canadian information is wrong?
22) "NHL-slåsskjempe er død" (Bjørnar Hjellen) 6 July, 2010
http://www.nrksport.no/ishockey/1.7198831
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes "Amerikanen falt sammen under en båttur sammen med familien i Windsor, Ontario, i Canada, melder NHL.com. Han ble kun 45 år gammel." American? That is wrong. Propert's nationality is Canadian, not American. He's from Canada, not from the USA. The story was later corrected, yet no reply received from the journalist.
23) Ryddesjau før topplederne kommer (NRK Norway) 25 June, 2010
http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/verden/1.7184788
In this Norwegian story about the Canadian hosted G-8/G-20 in Toronto, Canada, NRK posts the location the journalist is reporting from as "USA" above his name. The reporter, and the G-20 was in fact taking place in Toronto, Canada, not in the USA. After notifying NRK there was a mistake and that the G-20 and the reporter was in fact taking place in Canada, and not in the USA, NRK changed it to read "G20." Why is it okay to write the "USA", but when finding out about the wrong country mistake changed to read "G20" and not "Canada?" It's okay to list "USA" when they thought the G20 was taking place in the USA, but not Canada? Why?

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