Saturday, June 27, 2009

Forskning - 6 Stories

1) Stereotyper gjør jenter mattesvake (Ingrid Spilde) 23 October 2006
http://www.forskning.no/Artikler/2006/oktober/1161344503.55
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes: "Det antyder i hvert fall en ny amerikansk undersøkelse... - Funnene tyder på at folk har en tendens til å godta genetiske forklaringer, som om de er sterkere og mer uunngåelige, sier Steven Heine fra University of British Columbia i ei pressemelding." This is wrong nationality. The study is a Canadian study done at a Canadian university by Canadian researchers in Canada. Despite the fact the researchers, are Canadians, the university is a Canadian university, located in Canada, the Norwegian journalist writes "amerikansk undersøkelse." How is that a Canadian study is credited as being an American study? The British, American, and Australian media stories all state Canada, Canadians, and Canadian researchers, yet this journalist gives credit the country located beside Canada - the USA. How does something like this happen? Does the journalist think British Columbia is located in the USA? An e-mail was sent to the journalist, and three days later a reply was received. The reply states: "Thank you for notifying me on the error in my article on forskning.no. The reference to Americans was a pure mistake, and I apologise. Naturally, it was no intention of mine to take credit away from Canadian scientists. The text is now corrected." This is an excellent (and rare) example of a professional, prompt, and thoughtful reply, with a desire to fix the error. It doesn't explain how the Canadians were mistaken and reported as Americans in the first place, but positive to see the proper credit given in this story. Sadly, many notification of errors about Canada, Canadians and Canadian culture to the Norwegian media go unanswered, with no corrections even made to most stories. Why would Norwegian journalists not want to at least correct their mistakes in their stories?
2) Norge, en biologisk smeltedigel (Erik Tunstad, Redaktør)
There is nothing technically wrong in this story mentioning the University of British Columbia, but perhaps mentioning the country the university is located in would be helpful to the readers. It is extremely doubtful that most Norwegians know where British Columbia is located, let alone that it is in Canada.
3) Med flagget til bunns (Maja Sojtaric Journalist, Universitetet i Tromsø) 4 April 2008
http://www.forskning.no/Artikler/2008/mars/1206694607.43
In this story the Norwegian journalist writes: "Den kanadiske presidenten Stephen Harper sier at Canada ikke har nok infrastruktur i disse farvann til å kunne beskytte sin egen sikkerhet og sine egne interesser." This is a mistake. Canada does not have a president, Canada has a Prime Minister. Mexico and the USA are the only two countries in North America with a president. Canada has a Queen, and is a parliamentary system with the Queen of Canada as head of state. The story was later corrected.
4) Med flagget til bunns (By Maja Sojtaric ) 4 April 2008
http://www.forskning.no/Artikler/2008/mars/1206694607.43In this story the Norwegian journalist (from the Univesity of Tromsø) writes "Den kanadiske presidenten Stephen Harper sier at Canada ikke har nok infrastruktur i disse farvann til å kunne beskytte sin egen sikkerhet og sine egne interesser." Canadian President? Canada does not have a president, it has what is called a Prime Minister. Mexico and the USA are the only two republics in North America, and thus the only two countries in North America with a president. Canada is not a republic, and has basically the same system of government as Great Britain. Canada is a constitutional monarchy with Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, with a parliamentary system of government modelled off Great Britain's government. Canada was a former French colony, conquered by Britain in 1758-1760, and given to Britain by treaty in 1763, and remained a British colony until Canadians negotiated independence from Great Britain in 1867. This is an excellent example of how so often many Norwegian journalists think or apply what they know of the USA, must be the same in Canada. Why do so many Norwegian stories so often say Canada uses USA's currency (and not Canadian currency), that Canada has "states" (and not Canada provinces), and Canada has a "president" (and not a Canadian Prime Minister?), etc. How are such basic facts of Canada so often incorrectly reported? Some Norwegian journalists must be so convinced they "know" Canada to write this information without even checking their basic facts before printing a story.
5) Besøk i Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, februar 2007 (November 2007)http://64.233.167.104/searchq=cache:sKxzM96xa4AJ:forskningsweb.org/slb/files/2007/11/besk_i_edmonton_canada.pdf+%22canadiske+staten%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=11&gl=ca
In this report it states: "Neil MacDonald, Eduardo Bruera og flere har siden slutten av 80-tallet bygget opp et aktivt miljø for palliativ medisin i Edmonton i den canadiske staten Alberta. Som ledd i dette, er Edmonton Classification System for Cancer Pain blitt utviklet..." Alberta is a Canadian province, not a "state." Alberta became a province in Canada in 1905, the same year Norway received independence from Sweden. Canada has been using the French system of provinces for 345 years since Canada became a Royal Province of France in 1663. Canada does not have, and has never had states. Mexico and USA are the only two countries in North America with states.
6) Amerikas minste dinosaur (By Andreas R. Graven) 17 March 2009
http://www.forskning.no/artikler/2009/mars/213809
This should say "Nord-Amerikas minste dinosaur." It was found in Canada, not in America, and Canada is located in North America.

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